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303

Index

  • Cafaro, Philip, [263n.4]

  • Cameron, Sharon, 6, 81–83, 91–92, 179, 180, [247n.5]

  • Canby, Henry Seidel, 76, 143, [264n.9]

  • Cardinal, Roger, 7, [268n.19]

  • Carlyle, Thomas, 52–53, [244n.15]

  • Cartesianism.See mindbody dualism

  • Cartesian subject, 4, 117, 198.See also self/world

  • Cavell, Stanley, 4–5, 6, 35–36, 182, 194, 195, [271n.13], [273n.19]

  • change, 34, 42–43, [239n.15]

  • Channing, William Ellery, 150, [255n.26]

  • chemistry, 108–9

  • Christianity, 167, [274n.1]

  • civil disobedience, 189, 190, 193, [274n.23]

  • Clay, E. R., [235n.3]

  • Clodd, Edward, 128

  • cognition, constructivist theory of, 225, [260n.16], [282n.6]

  • coherenece, as a value, 138

  • Coleridge, Samuel Taylor, [250n.14]; Aids to Reflection,[231n.1]; Biographia Literaria,[276n.11]; drug use by, 199; Hints towards the Formation of a More Comprehensive Theory of Life,88–90, [250n.13]; on individuation, 171; influence on Thoreau, 17, 88, 89–90, 91; Kant's influence on, 88; on organic vs. inorganic world, 128; on otherness, 209; travels of, 203; on Understanding and Reason, [231n.1]; vitalism of, 110

  • colonial-Indian relations, 48–49, 56

  • color/ light, 84–85, [249n.10]

  • Comte, August, 106–7

  • Conant, Susan, [241n.4]

  • Confessions (Augustine), 16, 25, 26–27, 31–32, [234n.2], [269n.3]

  • consciousness: and the elusive present, 27–28; human vs. divine, 32; meaning/value as dependent on, 14–15; and memory, 74; mystical aspect of, 15–16; public vs. private aspects of, 15.See also James, William; self-consciousness

  • Constable, John, 224–25

  • constructivism, 133, [260n.16]

  • Copernican revolution, [275n.4]

  • Correspondence, 91–92, 103, [252n.20], [253n.21]

  • Cosslett, Tess, 127–29

  • The Crisis of European Sciences (Husserl), 226–27, [283nn.9–10]

  • Critical Philosophy, 201, [276n.6]. See also Kant, Immanuel

  • cultural history, 16–17, 164.See also history/history writing

  • Dale, Peter, [256n.3]

  • Dana, James, 125

  • Darwin, Charles, 123, 128, 150; Climbing Plants,147–48;The Fertilization of Orchids,147–48;Insectivorous Plants,147–48;On the Origin of Species,110, 111, 125, 147, 148, [263n.7]. See also evolution

  • Daston, Lorraine, 105–6

  • deconstructionism, [279n.18]

  • Deevey, Edward S., Jr., [264n.10]

  • democracy, 191, [274n.23]

  • Descartes, René, 116, 213.See also mindbody dualism

  • destiny, 19–20, 171, [238n.14]


305
  • facts, 107; as complex/contextdependent, 196, [275n.2]; listing of, in nature observations, 146; and natural history/history writing, 99–100; personalized (see nature observations); as poetic/aesthetic, 228; and poetic vision, 18; as representing reality, 196; and science, 113–18, 136, [258n.9]; vs. theory, 119–20, 138, [258n.12]; vs. values, 137–38


  • 306
  • fate.See destiny

  • Feyerabend, Paul, 133

  • Fichte, Johann Gottlieb, 8, 19, 166, 207–10, [276n.11], [277nn.12–15]. See also selfpositing I

  • Foerster, Norman, [267n.13]

  • Fredriksen, Paula L., 68

  • freedom, 12.See also autonomy free will, 42–43, 171, 200, [276n.6]

  • Freud, Sigmund, x, 58

  • Fritzell, Peter, 219, 220

  • Fugitive Slave Law (1850), 190–91, [274n.22]

  • Fuller, Margaret, 145

  • future, 26, 43–44, [240n.16]

  • Kalendar project, 80–81, 147

  • Kant, Immanuel, [250n.14]; categorical imperative of, [274n.1]; on idealism, [253n.21]; influence on Coleridge, 88; influence on Thoreau, 88, 152; Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science,109; on mind, [275n.4]; on the noumena, 119; on self, 28, 209; on theoretical vs. practical reason, 200–201, [275n.4], [277n.12]; Third Critique,109, [275n.5]; on transcendental apperception, 198–99; on the transcendental faculty, [275n.5]; on transcendental synthesis, 116; on unity of apperception, 207; on virtue, 167

  • Kateb, George, [238n.14]

  • Keats, John, [261n.20]

  • Kierkegaard, S⊘ren, 180, 183, 210, [278n.17], [279n.18]; Fear and Trembling,181–82

  • King Philip's War, 49

  • King William's War, 48, [242n.6]

  • knowledge: empirical experience as basis for, 107 (see also positivism); fragmentation of, 140; harmonization of, 91; integration of forms of, 142; personalizing of, 6, 17; selectiveness of, 2, 9; tacit dimension, 134–35; value of, 76. See also epistemology; facts; history/history writing; natural history/history writing; nature observations; objectivity; positivism; science “Know thyself,” 25, 219, [234n.1]

  • Kolakowski, Leszek, 107, [256n.2]

  • Krell, David, 74

  • Krutch, Joseph Wood, 6, [273n.20]

  • Kuhn, Thomas: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions,132–33, [259n.15]

  • MacIntyre, Alisdair, 167–68

  • Magritte, René, 179

  • “manifest destiny,” 23

  • man/nature. See self/world

  • Manual of the Botany of the Northern United States (Gray), 123

  • Marcuse, Herbert, [283n.10]

  • Marx, Karl, 210; Communist Manifesto,23

  • Marx, Leo, 14–15, 143, [270n.10], [281n.23]

  • Massachusetts, libraries of, 122

  • mathematics, 86

  • Mather, Cotton, [241n.4]; Magnalia Christi Americana,48, 49, 50, [242n.5], [243n.8]


  • 309
  • Matthiessen, Francis O., [234n.6], [250n.17]

  • McAtee, W. L., [267n.13]

  • McGregor, Robert Kuhn, 10, 63, [245n.17]

  • McIntosh, James, 6, 89, [253n.21], [255n.27], [270n.8]

  • memory: Augustine on, 31–32; authenticity of, 70; and consciousness, 74; as constructed, 59–68, [245n.16]; despondent, 69–70; history as remade by, 68–74; and history/history writing, 40–41, 45–47; and identity, 69, 70, 71, 73, 74; moral character of, 69, 70, 71–72; and natural history/history writing, 40–41, 215; as public, 72; and self, 215; and the soul, 31; and time, 31–32, 40; and writing/inscription, 74. See also history/history writing; time

  • Merleau-Ponty, Maurice, [282n.8]

  • metaphysics, 107, [279n.20]

  • Milder, Robert, 20–21, [237n.12]

  • Mill, John Stuart, 118, [258n.12], [274n.1]

  • mind: as active participant in the world, 225; cognitive functions of, [275n.4]; elusiveness of, 210; and nature, 91; time as a function of, 27, 29, 40

  • mindbody dualism: degrees of, 177; and facts, 116–17; influence of, 116; positivist answer to, 116–17; and primal substance, [257n.5]; reductionist answer to, 110. See also self/world

  • Minkowski, Hermann, [261n.20]

  • Mirick, B. L.: History of Haverhill,

  • Massachusetts, 48, 50, [243n.8]

  • moralism, 100–101

  • morality, 18–19, 163–94; and autonomy, 163–64, 165–66; conceptions of, 5, [274n.1]; and environmentalism, 163; and free will, 171; and heroic selfimage, 185–94, [272n.16], [273n.19], [273n.20]; and imagination, 172; and individuality, 194; individual vs. communal interests, 163, 189; and knowledge of the world, 195; metaphysical basis of, [279n.20]; and narrative, 168–69, [269n.3]; and natural beauty/law, 192–93; and observer's separateness from nature, 173–74, [270n.8]; and personalization of experience, 174; and politics, 188–94, [273n.21]; as private vs. public, 172–73; reason as foundation of, 127–28; and reform of self/society, 193; scope of, 172; and seeing, 172, 195; and self, 18; and self-consciousness, 5–6, 166–67; and selfdefinition/personhood, 170–71, 194; self-determination as foundation of, 166; and self-responsibility, 42, 165–66, 171, 191, [274n.1]; spiritual aspect of, 169–71, 180–81, 184; and Thoreau's ability to communicate his vision, 20–21, 173–85; time's moral character, 31, 35, 37–38, 42, [235n.6], [237n.13]; and value, 5–6; and virtue, 19, 167–73, 197–98, [269n.4], [269n.5]. See also selfpositing I

  • Morelli, Giovanni, 58

  • Moser, E. I., [240n.1]

  • Mount Ktaadn (Maine), 63, 99, 145, [245n.17]

  • Müller, Johannes P., 224

  • Museum of Science (Boston Society of Natural History), 124

  • mysticism: of consciousness, 15–16; of Emerson, [255n.27]; and the limits of language, 183; of Plotinus, [236n.9]; and solitude, 13, 38–39; and subject/object distinction, 179; and transcendental experience, 78–79. See also under Thoreau, Henry David

  • myth, 65–66, [246n.21]

  • Nagel, Thomas, 112, 198, [257n.7]

  • narrative, 47–53, 168–69, [269n.3]

  • Nash, Roderick, [233n.5]


  • 310
  • natural history/history writing, 16, 75–103; and color/light, 84–85, [249n.10]; and Correspondence, 91–92, 103, [252n.20], [253n.21]; as creative/poetic/biased, 75, 102, 215; vs. cultural history, 16–17; and detached observation, 80–81; and dissolved observation, 81–82, [247n.5]; and dualism of nature, 88–89; emotionalism of, 84, [249n.9]; and environmental crisis, [248n.7]; and epistemology, 76–83; and facts, 99–100; and Holism, Empirical vs. Rational, 90–91; and human history, 57–58; and immediacy of experience, 16–17; and individuation, 87–90, [250n.13]; legitimation of interpretation of, 81; and memory, 40–41, 215; moral character of, 16–17, 75, [242n.7]; and moralism, 100–101; and the observer, 83–84, 92–93, 131–32; and the organizing principle, 88; and the Primal Plant/unity of nature, 86–88; Romanticism of, 75, 87–88, 102; and seeing, 83–92; and subject/object distinction, 81, 114, [247n.5], [248n.7], [249nn.10–11]; and time, 77–78; and vitality, 88; and worlding of nature, 92–93, [250n.15]. See also nature; nature observations; Transcendentalism

  • natural law, 87, 91, 128, 138, 192–93, 200, [248n.7]

  • nature: beauty of, 89, 102, 111, 192–93; vs. civilization's inhibition, 172; as constructed, 20, 84, [248n.7], [249n.8]; harmony/community in, 148–50, [263n.8]; ideal, 183–84; immersion in, 99, 100, 101, 102; indifference of, 43, 63; integration vs. domination of, 101, [255n.27]; integration with, 77; interrelatedness/connectedness in, 154, [267n.14]; kinship with, 128; observations of, 17–18, 140–62 (see also nature observations); observer's separateness from, 173–74, [270n.8]; organic view of, 129; otherness of, 63; pastoral vision of, 99; polarity/dualism in, 88–89, 91; as a retreat from man, x; sensuousness of, 96–97, 99, 102; telos of, 88–89; union with, 34, 37–38; unity of, 86–88, 90–91, 102, 138–39, [250n.12]; unity of, and science, 108–12, [256n.3], [257n.5]; value of, 96; as within us, 202–3; worlding of, 92–93, [250n.15]. See also natural history/history writing; nature observations

  • “Nature” (R. W. Emerson), [252n.19], [262n.1]

  • nature observations, 140–62; and attention to detail, 160–61; and awe, 145; and beauty, 152–57, 161–62, [267n.16]; bream episode, 143–45; criticism of, 151, [267n.13]; economic benefits to, 149; educational role of, 147, [263n.6]; and evolutionary theory, 148, [263n.8]; and facts, listing of, 146; and harmony/community, 148–50, [263n.8]; individual vision vs. objectivity in, 151–52; and interrelatedness/connectedness, 154, [267n.14]; as a literary pursuit, [264n.9]; and the meaning of life's mystery, 149; moral perception in, 161–62; pastoral sensitivity of, 145–47; poetic aspect of, 160; and realness of phenomena, [262n.3]; seed study, 146–49, [263n.7]; and selfawareness/selfreflection, 157–62; spiritual aspect of, 149–50, 152–53; and Thoreau's science, 141, 143–53, [262n.1]

  • Naturphilosophie,88, 91, 119, [250n.14]

  • Neff, Mary (a pioneer nurse), 48–49

  • Nehamas, Arthur, [239n.15]

  • neo-Platonists, [235n.6]

  • neurosis, [281n.21]

  • New England Zion, [241n.4]

  • Newton, Isaac, 84, 110, 145, 199

  • Nietzsche, Friedrich, 222; on character's influence on philosophy, 7–9;


    311
    Emerson's influence on, 43, [238n.14]; on eternal recurrence, [238n.14], [239n.15]; on eternity and selfwilled overcoming, 43, [239n.15]; on existential loneliness, 43; “God is dead,” 44; on morality, 166, 171, [274n.1]; perspectivism of, 136; on science, 227, [283n.11]; on subjectivity vs. objectivity in history writing, [243n.9]; on will, [272n.16], [274n.1]

  • nihilism, 43–44, 218–19

  • noumena, 119

  • Reason: as foundation of morality, 127–28; vs. free will, [276n.6]; scientific, 226–27, [283n.10]; theoretical vs. practical, 200–201, 207, [275n.4]; vs. Understanding, [231n.1]; unity of, 200–202, 207–8, 227, [277n.12], [283n.9]

  • reductionism, 109–10, 125, 126–27, [257n.4]

  • reform of self/society, 193

  • relation, 199, 209–10. See also otherness

  • res cogitans/res extensa. See self/world

  • “Resistance to Civil Government” (Thoreau), 190, 193

  • responsibility, 42–43, [239n.15]. See also morality; self-responsibility

  • Richardson, Robert, [252n.19], [263n.7]

  • Rieff, Philip: Freud: The Mind of the Moralist,x; The Triumph of the Therapeutic,x

  • river, 64, [246n.18]

  • Romanticism: critique of science, 126–27, 140; expressive turn of, [273n.20]; goals of, 108; holism of, [257n.5]; and man/nature as unified, 84–85; and man's place in nature, 198–200; of natural history/history writing, 75, 87–88, 102; vs. positivism, 17, 105–13, 120, 126; and the present, [246n.20]; and the primacy of the knower, 93; and relativism, 214; and selfdiscovery, 7; and selfhood, 203–4. See also Coleridge, Samuel Taylor; Fichte, Johann Gottlieb; Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von; idealism; selfpositing I; Transcendentalism

  • Rosen, Stanley, [237n.13]

  • Rosenblum, N. L., [274n.23]

  • Ross, Donald, 10, 11, [232n.2], [240n.1]

  • Rossi, William, 105

  • Rousseau, Jean-Jacques, 111, 213, [281n.22]; Confessions,215

  • Ruskin, John, 224–25, [262n.3]

  • Sadi, 205

  • Salt, Henry, [251n.17]

  • Sanborn, Frank, [263n.7]

  • Sattelmeyer, Robert, 30, 88

  • Schelling, Friedrich, [250n.14]; influence on Thoreau, 88, 91

  • Schiller, Friedrich von, 111, 126


  • 313
  • science, 17, 104–39; as aesthetic/personalized/creative, 108, 135–39, 140–41, [261nn.19–20] (see also nature observations); aims vs. methods of, 108; American, 121–25; Cartesian dualism's influence on, 116–17; constructivism in, 133, [260n.16]; criticism of, 72, 227, [283n.11]; democratization of, 124; and disenchantment, 126, [259n.14]; and facts, 113–18, 136, [258n.9]; fear of power of, 126; growth of, 123–24, 143; history of, 85; and humanism, 125–31, 141 (see also nature observations); hypothesis in, role of, 129; and idealism, 111, 119; Imagination in, 129–30; and inductivism, 119, 120, [258n.12]; interpretation in, 115; and kinship with nature, 128; and laws of nature, 128, 138; and meaning, 127, 140, 141; as meaningful, 131–39, 227–28, [283n.12]; methods of, 108, 119, 136, 144–45; normative standing of, 133, [260n.16]; objectivity in, as communal, 133; objectivity/truth in, 72, 85, [246n.22], [249n.11]; objectivity vs. subjectivity in, 105–6, 108–9, 112–13, 116–17, 130, [257n.7], [262n.1]; and organic vs. inorganic world, 109, 110, 128; and organism, 129; paradigms of, 132–33; and perspectivism, 136; and philosophy, 118–21, [258n.12], [260n.16]; philosophy of, 85; and poetry, 137, 141–42, 228, [262n.3], [283n.12]; positivist, 105–13, 120, 134, [256n.2]. (see also positivism); postmodern, 116; professionalization of, 121–25; progress/discovery in, 132–33, 136, [259n.15]; and reductionism, 125, 126–27; Romanticist critique of, 126–27, 140; and scientist as individual, 117; and search for truth, 127–28, 133; and sensationalism, 119; societies, 123–24; and unity in nature/society, 108–12, [256n.3], [257n.5]; values of, 130, 137–38; vitalism debate in, 109–11. See also facts; natural history/history writing; positivism; Walls, Laura Dassow

  • Science Wars, [260n.16]

  • “scientist,” use of, 59, [244n.12]

  • seed study, 146–49, [263n.7]

  • self: in action, 207, 212–13, [276n.11]; and autobiography, 41; and the elusive present, 27–28; and free action, 42–43; indeterminacy of, 212; as knower, 6; meaninglessness of, [279n.20]; and memory, 215; as a metaphysical construct, [279n.20]; and modernity, 157; moral character of, 6, 71–72; and moral character of agency, 42, 43; and morality, 18, 170–71, 194; personal identity, 205–6; primacy of identity of, 10, 207, 218; as reflexive, [278n.17]; and selfdefinition, 157, 170–71, 194; and self-determination, 6–7, 20, 42, 166, [276n.11]; splitting of, 93, 204–5, [276n.10]; in time, 39–44; unifying, transcendental, 28; unity of, 213. See also selfpositing I; self/world

  • selfawareness/selfreflection, in nature observations, 157–62

  • self-consciousness, 2, 3, 15, 93; elusiveness of, 210; and morality, 5–6, 166–67; and the selfpositing I, 203–4, 207, 218–19, [276nn.9–10], [277n.12]. selfpositing I, 166, 195–221; and autobiography, 215–16; and autonomy, 199–200, 208, 218, [279n.18]; and destiny, 19–20; Fichte's formulation of, 207–8; and Imagination, 197; and nature as within us, 202–3; and the other, 208, 209–10, 211–12, [277n.15], [279n.18]; and personal identity, 205–6; and philosophy of the subject, 198–203; and the problem of the self, 203–12, 213; psychological elusiveness of, 210–11; and relation, 199, 209–10; and the search for self, 212–21; self as


    314
    isolated entity vs. relation, 19; and self-consciousness, 203–4, 207, 218–19, [276nn.9–10], [277n.12]; and selfstriving, 209, [277n.14]; and selfsufficiency, 208, [277n.13]; and solipsism, 206–7, 208; and solitude, 19; and Thoreau's prayer of selfhood/moral agency, 197–98, [275n.3]; and transcendental apperception, 198–99; and unity of Reason, 207–8, [277n.12]. See also self; self-consciousness

  • self-responsibility, 42, 165–66, 171, 191, [274n.1]

  • selfstriving, 209, [277n.14]

  • selfsufficiency, 208, [277n.13]

  • self/world: and alienation, 14; integration of, 4, 116, 136, 203; metaphysical unity of, 82–83, 84–85; and nature as within us, 202–3; separateness of, 92. See also mindbody dualism

  • semiotics, 53–59, [244n.11]

  • Shanley, Lynden, [232n.2]

  • simplicity, as a value, 138

  • slavery, 189–91, 193, [274n.22]

  • “Slavery in Massachusetts” (Thoreau), 190–91, [274n.22]

  • Snow, C. P.: The Two Cultures,140

  • Socrates, 167; on truth, 3

  • solipsism, 206–7, 208

  • solitude: and despondent memories, 69–70; and egocentrism, 221–22; and inability to communicate, 174–75; insignificance of, 206; and misanthropy, [276n.10]; and mystical experience, 13, 38–39; and privacy, 13–14; and the self, 19, 164. See also solipsism

  • soul, 34, 95, [235n.6]

  • Spencer, Herbert, 130

  • Spinoza, Baruch, [257n.5], [276n.6]

  • spirituality: and morality, 169–71, 180–81, 184; of nature observations, 149–50, 152–53. See also mysticism; Thoreau, Henry David: mysticism/spiritualism of

  • Stack, George, [238n.14]

  • Stahl, George: True Theory of Medicine,110

  • Stoics, [252n.19]

  • stream of consciousness writing, 82

  • stream of experience, 37, [236n.7]

  • structuralism, [279n.18]

  • subject/object distinction: in history writing, 53, 59, 68, 71, 73, [243n.9]; in mystical states, 179; and natural history/history writing, 81, [247n.5], [248n.7], [249nn.10–11]; and nature as constructed, 20; and observation, 81–82; and positivism, 108–9, 117–18, 134; in science, 105–6, 108–9, 112–13, 116–17, 130, [257n.7], [262n.1]; and time, 28–29. See also Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von; objectivity; Polanyi, Michael

  • substance, primal, [257n.5]

  • “The Succession of Forest Trees” (Thoreau), 147–49

  • Ulrich, Laurel Thatcher, [241n.4]

  • Underground Railroad, 23

  • utilitarianism, [274n.1]

  • value, as “moral,” 5–6

  • Van Cromphout, Gustaaf, 157, [255n.25]

  • Van Doren, Mark, [252n.19]

  • Vico, Giambattista, 85

  • Vienna Circle, 132, 134

  • virtue: and the good life, 167–68, 171; life of, definition of, 215–16; as living deliberately, 19, 169; and morality, 19, 167–73, 197–98, [269n.4], [269n.5]; and narrative, 168–69, 171

  • vision, psychology/physiology of, 224

  • visions. See dreams; mysticism

  • vitalism, 109–11, 226

  • vitality, 88

  • von Frank, Albert J., 190, [274n.22]

  • Walden (Thoreau): on artist of Kouroo, 78, 155, [267n.16]; on biocentrism/humanitarianism, 219; “Conclusion,” 154, [232n.2]; emotionalism of, [249n.9]; on evening, 66–67; hero images in, 186; on humanity as one with nature, 148–49; “I long ago lost a hound” passage, 35; on individuality/independence, 7; on individuation in nature, 89–90; influence/popularity of, 9; on laws of nature, 138; loon description in, [247n.6]; on morality, 169, 171–72, 193, [269n.5]; on morning, 65–66, [246n.21]; on mystical state/time suspension, 77–78, [247n.1]; on nature as natural environment vs. natural self, 9; on past as present, 66; personhood as central in, 32–33; polarity in, 89; politics of, 188; “The Ponds,” [232n.2]; prephilosophical context of, 4–5; publication of, 10; on reality, 195; Romanticism of, [232n.2]; sandbank description in, 81, 87, 153, 154, 155, [247n.4]; on self-consciousness, 204, [276nn.9–10]; selfhood in, 218; selfmythology of, 20; on self-responsibility, 42; semiotic character of, 56–57; on situating humanity in nature, 131; on solitude, 14, 165; “Spring,” [232n.2]; and subject/object distinction, 81, [247n.6]; themes of, [232n.2]; on time, 25, 29, 34–39, 43; on unity of nature, 87; “Where I Lived, and What I Lived For,” 195; on why Thoreau left the woods, 12–13

  • Walden Pond, 60–61, 63–64, [245n.16]

  • “Walking” (Thoreau), 148, 158, 170, 177, 187, 217

  • Walls, Laura Dassow, 10, 90, 111, 150, [250n.16], [264n.10], [265n.11]

  • Weber, Max, 126, 127, [259n.14]

  • A Week (Thoreau): brothers' return/apple tree story, 68–69; coherence lacking in, 52; on consciousness, 33–34; Hannah Duston story in, 48, 49–52, [243n.8]; egocentrism


    317
    of, 33–34; Elisha tree story, 53–56; on Goethe, 155, [268n.17]; on history/memory, 46–47, [240n.2], [241n.3]; memory in, 64; on moralism, 102; on mysticism, 39, [236n.9]; on myth, 65; on nature observations, 18; on the poethistorian, 41; on poetry, 215; polarity in, 89; politics of, 188; the present in, 64, [246n.20]; on religion, 100; as a remembrance, 47, [240n.3]; on Saddleback Mountain climb, 67; on scientific history, 48; semiotic character of, 53–56; on stream of experience, [236n.7]; on time/history, 26, 29, 54, [235n.4]; on Transcendentalism, 98, [232n.2]

  • Whewell, William, [244n.12], [258n.12]; The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences,118–20

  • White, Gilbert, 150

  • Whitman, Walt, 124, 125–26, 171

  • Whitney, Josiah, 122

  • wilderness: and Asian images, 62–63; Thoreau's early visions of, 60–61, [245n.16]; and the West, 187

  • Wild Fruits (Thoreau), 146–47, [263n.6]

  • wildness: and civilization, [255n.26]; vs. civilizing nature of writing, 4; and effacement of the human, 82–83 (see also self/world); and freedom, 12; and personalized experience of nature, 177–78; as primary unmediated, 202 “wild,” use of, 9, 11

  • will, [272n.16], [274n.1]

  • Williams, Bernard, 18

  • Wilson, Eric, [262n.1]

  • Wittgenstein, Ludwig, 107, 181, 182, 184, [271n.12], [271n.14], [279n.20], [282n.7]

  • Wordsworth, William, [281n.22]; The Prelude,215

  • writing, 82–83, 176–80, 182–85, [270n.10], [271n.13]

  • Zeitschrift für wissenschaftliche Zoologie,124–25

  • zoology, 123


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