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NOTES

1. Roland Barthes, “The Death of the Author,” in Image-Music-Text, trans. Stephen Heath (New York: Hill and Wang, 1977), 146. [BACK]

2. Lisa Tickner, “Feminism, Art History, and Sexual Difference,” Genders no. 3 (Fall 1988): 93. [BACK]

3. Ibid. [BACK]

4. Jon Bird, Jo Anna Isaak, and Sylvère Lotringer, Nancy Spero (London: Phaidon, 1996). [BACK]

5. I was not able to resolve this paradox to my satisfaction, but dissertations, unlike books, can structurally contain an apparent inconsistency and still be a contribution to scholarship. [BACK]

6. Linda Nochlin, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” in Art and Sexual Politics, ed. E. Baker and T. Hess (New York: Macmillan, 1973); reprinted in Women, Art, and Power and Other Essays (New York: Harper & Row, 1988), 145–78. [BACK]

7. Anne Sutherland Harris and Linda Nochlin, Women Artists 1550–1950 (Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 1976). [BACK]

8. Lawrence Alloway, “Art,” Nation, April 2, 1973, 446. Alloway states that the Codex Artaud presents “a remarkable compound of two kinds of signs in which verbal and visual image interpenetrate.” [BACK]

9. Laura Cottingham, “Notes on ‘Lesbian,’” Art Journal 55, no. 4 (Winter 1996): 72–77; see esp. 76. [BACK]

10. Reprinted in Hans-Ulrich Obrist, ed., Leon Golub: Do Paintings Bite? Selected Texts 1948–1996 (Ostfildern, Germany: Cantz, 1997), 74. [BACK]

11. Jonathan Katz, “The Art of Code: Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg,” in Significant Others: Creativity and Intimate Partnership, ed. Whitney Chadwick and Isabelle de Courtivron (New York: Thames and Hudson, 1993), 189–206. [BACK]

12. Trinh T. Minh-ha, Woman Native Other: Writing Postcoloniality and Feminism (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1989), 6. [BACK]


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