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I

Impersonation:

Swift's use of, 64 , 72 , 78 , 80 -81

Implication:

acknowledged by author, 12 -16;

ambiguous antithesis, 52 -59, 65 -70, 74 -75, 79 ;

bipolar, 107 ;

affecting clarity, 9 , 10 , 14 -15;

as mock defense, 15 ;

disavowed by author, 7 -12, 17 -18;

didactic (conventional), 105 -8;

false explication, 15 -16;

and explicit meaning, 1 , 4 , 147 -48, and figurative language.

see Figurative language;

and genre, 33 -34;

and heroism, 2 -3;

and irony.

see Irony;

juxtaposition, 18 ;

and language.

see Lan-


154

guage;

mock-commentary, 99 -100;

and politics, 2 -3, 11 -17;

and prosody, 95 , 97 , 104 ;

and religion, 2 -5, 10 -11;

and sexual passion, 2 , 17 -18;

spectacle, 35 -36, 37 , 38 , 41 , 42 ;

style and meaning, 59 , 68 -69, 92 , 93 ;

subversive, 105 -8;

techniques of 4 -6, 9 -19;

thematic, 106 , 108 ;

and themes, 2 ;

topical, 106 , 108 ;

wordplay, 17

"Indamora," in Aureng-Zebe , 45

Ireland:

and England, 11 , 65 -71, 74 , 76 -82

Irony, and implication:

in Austen, 127 ;

in Pope, 9 , 84 ;

in Swift, 58 -59, 62 , 64 , 69 , 72 , 74

Isabella, Queen of Spain, 20


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